LA PLEGARIA DEL NÁUFRAGO,DEL LIBRO COLECCIÓN DE ORACIONES ESCOGIDAS DE ALLAN KARDECK.

ESTA ORACIÓN A MI CONCEPTO,DEBE FORMAR PARTE OBLIGATORIO DE LAS ORACIONES DE TODO ESPIRITISTA, O CREYENTE EN ESTA FÉ.

SU PUBLICACIÓN ES EN ATENCION A LAYLA,Y PARA TODOS MIS HERMANOS Y HERMANAS DE LOS CORDONES ESPIRITUALES DE LUZ.

“TORNA TU VISTA DIOS MÍO,

HACIA ESTA INFELIZ CRIATURA

NO ME DES SEPULTURA ENTRE LAS OLAS DEL MAR.

DAME LA FUERZA Y VALOR

PARA SALVAR EL ABISMO,

DAME GRACIA POR LO MISMO

QUE ES TAN GRANDE TU BONDAD.

SI YO CUAL FRÁGIL BARQUILLA,

POR MI SOBERBIA HALAGADO,

EL MAR HUMANO HE CRUZADO,

TAN SÓLO TRAS EL PLACER;

DÉJAME SEÑOR QUE VUELVA

A PISAR EL CONTINENTE,

HACIENDO VOTO FERVIENTE

DE SER CRISTIANO CON FÉ.

SI YO  CON MI TORPE FALTA

ME HE MECIDO ENTRE LA BRUMA

DESAFIANDO LA ESPUMA

QUE LEVANTA EL TEMPORAL,

TE OFREZCO QUE EN ADELANTE

NO TENDRÉ EL ATREVIMIENTO

DE ENSORDECER EL LAMENTO

DE AQUEL QUE SUFRE EN EL MAL.

Y SI SIGUIENDO MI RUMBO,

HE TENIDO HASTA EL DESCARO

DE BURLARME DE AQUEL FARO

QUE PUERTO ME DESIGNÓ;

YO TE PROMETO DIOS MÍO,

NO BURLARME DE ESA LUZ

QUE BRILLA SOBRE LA CRUZ

POR EL HIJO DE TU AMOR.

¡OH! TU PADRE DE MI ALMA,

QUE ESCUCHAS AL AFLIGIDO,

Y ME VES ARREPENTIDO

DE LO QUE MI VIDA FUE.

SÁLVAME DIOS MIO,SÁLVAME

Y DAME ANTES QUE DE CUENTA,

PARA QUE ME ARREPIENTA

EL TIEMPO PRECISO. AMÉN.”

 

 

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13 comentarios

  1. ke hermosa oracion y de gran precicion para la fe

    • La virtud y la madurez moral se demuestra por la capacidad que tenemos de escuchar con el alma. La inorancia de los muchos no compara con la sabiduria de los pocos. La luz verdadera se estrecha atravez del infinito y por lo tanto todos podemos verla con los ojos del alma. La verdad es sencilla como los petalos de una flor. Que la luz del Supremo alumbre tu camino.

      • william:ashé!,gracias que esa misma luz te alcance todos los dias.

        • Ashe is intrinsically related to the essential nature of creativity called iwa, perceptible to those who have “walked with the ancestors” and thus acquired critical and discerning eyes. Important to iwa are oju-inu, an “inner eye” or the artist’s insight, and oju-ona, the external harmony of artworks. For the Yoruba, the beauty of objects, performances, or texts lies not only in what catches the eye but also in the ashe derived from the work’s completeness. From these elements one can then discern the artwork’s iwa, or essential nature, and finally its ewa, or beauty.

          Another critical concept of Yoruba aesthetics is ara, the “evocative power” of visual, verbal, musical, and performance arts associated with the ability to amaze (Roberts and Roberts, p. 27). Ara bespeaks creativity through departure from norms. Yoruba artists are explorers, and their works reflect new understandings. As the Yoruba philosopher Olabiyi Yai states, art is always “unfinished and generative” (p. 107). Yoruba visual and verbal arts are also linked through ori, individuality, and iyato, difference and originality, and Yai argues for a definition of art that is “an invitation to infinite … difference and departure, and not a summation for sameness and imitation” (p. 113). The tradition-creativity binary posed for so many cultures is thereby dissolved, and “innovation is implied in the Yoruba idea of tradition” (p. 113).

          Cross-Cultural Thematics
          Through ashe, Yoruba arts are highly efficacious—that is, objects work and transform peoples’ lives. For many African cultures, how an object looks is related to the way it works, according to strict aesthetic specifications, for protection, healing, communication, mediation, or empowerment. Like aesthetics more generally, each culture has its own concepts of efficacy. For Bantu-speaking peoples of central, eastern, and southern Africa, a power called nkisi is manifest in sculpture and other expression, while for Mande-speaking peoples of western Africa, secret and instrumental knowledge is called nyama. For African Muslim mystics, baraka is a blessing energy emanating from saintly tombs, written and spoken verses, and visual forms. All these terms imply a power-knowledge relationship inhering in works of art, enabling their effectiveness and capacity.

          As is true for many other African philosophies, Yoruba aesthetics also privilege knowledge that is allusive, indirect, and enigmatic. Patterns in textiles and scarification; designs on ceramics, houses, and sculpture; graphic inscriptions on walls, masks, and the body; and verbal arts such as proverbs, epics, and songs communicate messages of cultural significance. These can be highly esoteric and understood only by the initiated. For example, geometric patterns on Bamana bogolanfini textiles from Mali encode women’s herbal medicinal recipes. In other cases, patterns connote resistance, as did the surreptitious painting of African National Congress colors on homes by southern African women during apartheid.

          Another characteristic of many African aesthetic systems is that objects, narratives, songs, and performances are interpreted by audiences in many different ways through intentional semantic variability. African artworks are semantically loaded texts abounding in exegetic richness. For example, among Luba peoples of the southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, thrones and staffs embody beauty and royal authority but are also mnemonic devices stimulating the making of history. Polysemy is also the product of a processual and accumulative aesthetic. The process of making art is often more valuable than the final products, and such dynamism is the essence of aesthetic experience. Once created, objects may have ephemeral usage before being destroyed or progressing to the next phases in layered histories.

          Aesthetics on the Move
          Recent study of African aesthetics includes two critically important thrusts: popular urban arts and diasporic art forms of the black Atlantic, and an Indian Ocean world linking eastern Africa with South Asia. Again, aesthetic principles of urban arts are contingent upon local use and intent. For instance, urban paintings by the late Congolese artist Tshibumba Kanda Matulu reflect an aesthetic inspired by European comic books while addressing issues of critical historical and political importance. Ghanaian urban arts reflect a vibrant immediacy stemming from subjects of daily life—from soccer to hairstyles to music and film—whereas arts of urban Senegal conform to the aesthetics of a very particular mystical Islam realized through mass-produced images and inspired by photography. As Karin Barber notes, African popular arts fall between the cracks of “traditional” and “elite” or “modern” art. The hybridized forms of Africa’s dynamic popular urban arts reflect not only constant absorption of ideas from the outside but also long-standing adaptive processes through which Africans have always been innovative players in world forums.

          Similar dynamism can be witnessed in Africa’s diasporic traditions. Much research, in particular that of Robert Farris Thompson, has shown that some of the most powerful aesthetic carryovers from west Africa to the black Atlantic are based on deeply embedded linguistic concepts such as an “aesthetic of the cool.” Thompson illuminates the origins of slang, gestures, and attitudes by demonstrating how certain aesthetic categories in the African Americas merge moral philosophy, right living, and artistic quality.

          One cannot discuss African aesthetics without addressing the effects of colonialism and postcolonialism and modernist and postmodernist expressive trends of the last century. Encounters and entanglements fostered by the colonial experience in Africa have produced complex issues of appropriation and commodification: compelling research reveals close association between aesthetic norms and capitalist incentives (Phillips and Steiner). This has been noticeable since the colonial conquests of the nineteenth century but earlier as well in Portuguese influence upon the late-fifteenth-century kingdoms of Benin in Nigeria and Kongo in Angola and the impact of Christianity in Ethiopia from the fourth century c.e. African styles were adapted to meet changing economic and political circumstances, with a most compelling case among the Mangbetu people of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and Zaire, whose aesthetics shifted to a European “naturalism” to meet foreign expectations.

          Similar dynamics are found on a global scale in the early twenty-first century. Those who study contemporary African arts define modernisms both discrepant from and overlapping with European models. In the early twentieth century, expatriate teachers opened fine arts schools in a number of African cities, introducing new techniques and aesthetics. Often these synthesized existing frameworks produced hybrid forms, as in the workshop of Ulli Beier in Nigeria.

          It is safe to say, though, that the most exciting time to study African aesthetics may be the present, for artistic landscapes are extending in many new ways. Scholar-curators such as Okwui Enwezor, artistic director of Documenta 11 in 2002 and the Second Johannesburg Biennale in 1997, and Salah Hassan, editor of Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, are transcending the boundaries of aesthetic discourse by introducing riveting work of emerging artists. Africa is a continent of richness, resilience, and diasporic energies because of how its traditions adapt to new circumstances. Whether in the domains of the most traditional rural art forms, such as masquerade or shrines, or in tourist arts, colonial encounters, early workshops, and art movements, African arts defy easy categorization; they simply do not sit still, nor have they ever. Across their huge diversities, African aesthetics can only be appreciated for their very multiplicity and systems of representation that they uphold, accommodate, and transform.

          See also Arts: Africa ; Literature: African Literature

  2. Hola Natividad me llamo Rosana y soy de Cuba, muchas veses entro en tus paginas a leer, tengo santo hecho, soy hija de Yemayá, tengo 16 años de santo y me llamo (omí nigue) me quede pensando cuando dices que la religión de Cuba tiene características diferentes, acaso no es la misma que se práctica en todo el mundo? También me puse muy triste cuando leí que un supuesto santero pidió la virginidad de una chica a cambio de resolverle su problema, ese es un mal nacido y pienso que si deveras tiene santo hecho que no lo creo, entonces no los respeta. Bueno solo quiero que me respondas mi pregunta y que me digas que santo tienes hecho, si puedes responde a mi e-mail y disculpa la molestia. Gracias

    • rosana fonseca:tengo hecho yemayá abure..maferefún nuestra mamá!
      me encantaría que me dijeses en cual artículo escribi que la religión de cuba tiene características diferentes,por que me parece interesante que hablemos de eso.
      ahora bien,en cuba la religión es la misma de todo el mundo,ya que es alli donde nace para el mundo su adaptación de la que viene de ´´africa..pero con algunas características que han cambiado..por ello,dime a que me refería,segun el artículo y te digo lo que creo,sin que eso sea un apalabra escrita en piedra,sólo es una opinión.

  3. mi nonbre es milenes campoy mira natividad yo me voy aser santo dentro de cuatro meses me lo marco chango en un tambor pero yo no tengo esa plata me ban acoronar obatala que puedo aser para conseguir esa plata mas rapido
    xf necesito qeu me ayudes soy de venezuela

    • MILIES CAMPOY:SI NO TIENES EL DINERO,PIENSA BIEN SI ES POR QUE NO DEBES DE APRESURARTE. DE TODOS MODOS PONLE A ELEGGUA UNA TIJERA Y UNA NAVAJA,A LA TIJERA LE PONES UN LAZO BLANCO Y LE PIDES A ELEGUA QUE TE ABRA EL CAMINO PARA LLEGAR PRONTO AL SANTO.

  4. mucha.didara para todos .utilice este sitio pq .encuentro mis oraciones.en estos momento estoy montado mi bovedad espiritual.q bien me siento con los seres amados.en estes pais no hay centro espirista como en mi camaguey q bueno seria montar un cent espiritual.

  5. Esta plegaria se la mande a una amiga k esta en unos momento dificiles.saludos .

  6. Hola me llamo teresita y soy hija de Olokun, leo y recomiendo mucho esta pagina, y me tomo el atreviento sin mal alguno de cortar y pegar algunos comentarios suyos que desgraciadamente se estan viviendo en Cuba, el cual sabra usted que para leer esta paguina le son muy dificil por el internet.Me gusta el espiritismo , y respeto la religión hago lo que creo me indican mis ergun y s i no trato de aprender de personas como usted. Solo quería comentar esto ya que en una ocacion escrivi pero me enrede totalmente por la explicación, asi que le doy las gracias por lo que leo diariamente.

  7. La primera vez la escuche en una misa espiritual y realmente me impactò tan profundamente que interrumpí para preguntar el nombre de tan divina plegaria y desde ese dia las veces q pueda la tengo dentro de mis plegarias favoritas,es simplemente hermosa y me llena de una paz infinita.

  8. Esta es la oración que mueve el alma que me inspira que me levanta

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